Twitter Takeover

Last week, alum and former Fundamentals of Digital Media (FDOM) Grad Assistant Randy Estevanes took over our Twitter account. He showed us and our followers what it’s like to work at a digital marketing firm.

Coffee might wake you up, but Red Bull gives you wings!

Always remember to proofread. It helps you iron out any unnecessary errors.

The SJMC also hires interns to assist in content creation and social media marketing. Learn more about it here.

Don’t forget to check out Esd & Associates when you’re looking for fall internships!

What better way to promote Goodwill on social media then with real authentic pictures!

Randy uses canva.com for its variety of design presentations, social media graphics and thousands of layouts.

Nice collage!

How awesome is it that Esd & Associates provides healthy snacks for them? #Winning

Knowing how to schedule post is an great tool to have under your belt!

Take note student: Google Adwords is a MAJOR asset!

Thank you again, Randy, for showing us your world. Once a Bobcat, always a Bobcat! #Eat’emUp

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Get to know Professor Prisca Ngondo

Have you met SJMC’s own Prisca Ngondo? Professor Ngondo teaches in the public relations sequence in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and she sat down with us this week to tell us a few things her students and colleagues might know about her. For this faulty spotlight, we thought it would be fun to find out what she likes to do when she’s not busy grading papers and more. Check it out below!

Q: Where are you from and currently live?

A: Harare, Zimbabwe, but I also claim the DFW (Dallas/ Forth Worth) and San Marcos, Texas. I currently live in San Marcos, Texas.

Q: How do you feel about Texas compared to your hometown?

A: They’re both hot! I can’t escape the heat.

Q: How long have you been with the SJMC?

A: Since August, 2015

Q: What’s different from this school compared to other schools you’ve worked with?

A: One main difference that I enjoy: Texas State is close to big cities, and it gives us access to industry professionals who we can connect with. Chico State is more remote, but I enjoyed both experiences for different reasons.

 Q: What courses do you teach?

A: Writing for PR, PR Research, Advanced Social Media and Analytics, Intro to PR

Q: How will the new Advanced Social Media and Analytics class help prepare students for the future?  

A: The class will help students because [social media] is the future. It prepares them to fill current industry needs and trends.

Q: What are some of your hobbies or things you enjoy doing outside of work?

A: Binge watching Netflix shows and hanging out with family and friends.

Q: What inspires you? 

A: My 3-year-old daughter, Yani. Her fresh, unbiased outlook on life is refreshing. She inspires me to be a better person and to work hard at work and at home.

Q: What do you find most fulfilling or rewarding about teaching college students?  

A: Their zest for life and willingness to learn.

Q: Any advice you have for current SJMC students?

A: Start how you want to finish!

 

Summer Sixteen

Welcome back, Bobcats! The well-anticipated Summer ’16 classes are now underway. We hope these past three weeks of summer vacation have given everyone a well needed break to come back refreshed and ready to start classes again.

Jasmine Clark

Jasmine Clark

Senior electronic media major Jasmine Clark started her summer class, Writing for Mass Media (MC 1313) with Lecturer Holly Wise, this week. She said the brief vacation helped her relax after the spring semester. “I just relaxed, chilled out and worked. I tried to mentally give myself a break,” she said.

It is important to have downtime after working hard. Check out The New York Times article, To Stay on Schedule, Take a Break, on the importance of taking regular breaks from mental tasks improves productivity and creativity and that skipping breaks can lead to stress and exhaustion.

 
Screen Shot 2016-06-09 at 3.29.27 PMClark said she likes the production aspect of electronic media and recommends any freshman who likes to analyze movies, to look into that major. Jasmine’s ready for summer. Are you?

 

TXST places 1st in AAF District 10 Competition

By Lisa Callahan & Matt Shoewalter

The halls of the Overton Hotel and Conference Center in Lubbock roared with the cheers and cries of Team 104 as Texas State University won First Place at the district level of the National Student Advertising Competition.

“Right when I heard them say ‘First Place: Texas State University,’ I knew that everything we worked so hard for was 1000% worth it,” Art Director Taylor Kaufman said. “It was a surreal moment, and I’ll never forget it.”

Lauren Friesenhahn (facing) embraces Kelsey Vaeth after the announcement

Lauren Friesenhahn (facing) embraces Kelsey Vaeth after the announcement
Photo courtesy Rachel Sipe

 

Each year, The National Student Advertising Competition, sponsored by the American Advertising Federation (AAF), challenges over 200 college chapters across the country to develop an integrated marketing campaign for a corporate client. This year, each competing team was tasked with developing a campaign for Snapple. Sixteen teams from Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana competed for District 10 in Lubbock from April 14-16.

Lecturer and Advertising Sequence Coordinator Jenny Buschhorn and Assistant Marketing Professor Dr. Rick Wilson held interviews in October and selected 17 students to join the team. The group of copywriters, producers, art directors, account executives, media planners and account planners began working on the campaign during their winter break, continued through their spring break and submitted their final plans book to AAF on March 25.

“The simple yet great feeling of having something you worked really hard on payoff is something that I wish everyone could experience,” said Producer Hector Sifuentes, who also received the District 10 Best Presenter Award. “It really taught us a lesson not only on the importance of working hard, but also on the philosophy of life. This is real education.”

Account Planner Rachel Sipe captured the winning moment on camera. The graduating senior said she was at a loss for words when First Place was announced.

Hector Sifuentes holding his Special Judges Award for Best Presenter

Hector Sifuentes holding his Special Judges Award for Best Presenter
Photo courtesy Rachel Sipe

“I couldn’t be more proud of our team,” Sipe said.

While taking home the prize was a major accomplishment, the team agreed that the relationships they formed with each other are even more rewarding.

“My favorite part of NSAC, even more so than winning, is how this ragtag group of students from different majors and walks of life became a family,” Art Director Angela Rhys said.

Media planner and presenter Roy Zorola agrees.

“There is such joy in the process,” Zorola said. “When the moment arrived, we realized that win or lose, the journey itself meant everything, because we did it together.”

Copywriter Lauren Friesenhahn credits the team’s supervisors for much of their success.

“Of course, we couldn’t have done it without Mom (Buschhorn) and Dad (Wilson),” Friesenhahn said. “If they didn’t push us as hard as they did, we wouldn’t be where we are right now.”

The Texas State University NSAC team last won a district competition in 2010 with their campaign for State Farm. The team went on to win second place at the national level.

Now, the District 10 champs begin preparation for semi-finals in May. This will determine whether the team advances to the national competition in Anaheim, California in June, when a total of eight teams go for the gold.

“While this District 10 win marks a major achievement for both us and Texas State, we still have more to go,” Account Executive and presenter Alexandria Reid said. “The work isn’t over, but we’ve never been afraid to work hard.”

The team celebrates their win on the conference room dance floor.

The team celebrates their win on the conference room dance floor. Photo courtesy Lauren Friesenhahn

From TXST to TV, catching up with Isamar Terrazas

Just two years after graduating from the SJMC at Texas State University, Isamar Terrazas has already paved a solid foundation for her career in broadcast journalism.

Terrazas is now working for KTLM Telemundo 40, as both the Assignments New Editor and as a Field Producer.

Isamar Terrazas holding an award

Isamar Terrazas

“I am so proud of how much this station has grown,” said Terrazas. “In the two years I have been here, we went from being the #4 station to being the #1 station.”

During her time at KTLM Telemundo 40, the station was nominated for 8 Lone Star Emmys.

“I was nominated as a producer for our hurricane special, Tras La Tormenta,” said Terrazas. “We won Overall Station Excellence, being the first station in the Rio Grande Valley to do this.”

KTLM Telemundo 40’s focus is very similar to English language markets, focusing on breaking news, weather and digital media. In particular, Terrazas worked on an investigate special, Clash at the Border, which focused on the abuses of Border Patrol agents.

Terrazas credits at least some of her success to her education from Texas State University, praising the both the faculty and the electronic media sequence.

“I feel like I learned so much from Ray Niekamp and Tim England,” said Terrazas. “Their program targets what it is like to work in a newsroom in real life.”

KTSW Sports interviews Bill Schoening and Bill Land

 

Six Texas State students from senior lecturer Larry Carlson’s Sports as News course and the KTSW Sports Dept. staff took a field trip to the home of the five-time NBA champion San Antonio Spurs, the AT&T Center, on Wednesday, March 30, just prior to San Antonio’s game against the New Orleans Pelicans.

Mike Kickirillo, Director of Broadcasting for the Spurs and a 1988 graduate, hosted the group with a tour of the newly refurbished arena’s camera set-up and the broadcast crew’s truck. Kickirillo showed the students how the pre-game show would be set up and explained the use of cameras, replays, statistic boxes and the integration of highlights, incoming scores from across the NBA, etc.

Inside the truck, the Texas State students met numerous Bobcat alums and even current students who are part of the Spurs’ broadcast team. In addition to Kickirillo, the other Texas Staters on the Spurs payroll include Daniel Ashcraft, Carter Snowden, Robert Fisher, Aerin Carreno, Taylor Hair, Avery Schneider and Tessa Andrade. Chuy Perez, one of the students on the trip, and a class member and KTSW staffer, said the overwhelming presence of Bobcats on the Spurs staff was inspiring.

“I’ve been a Spurs fan for so long, and the whole trip was incredible…just walking out on the court and getting to sit on the Spurs bench was amazing,” Perez said. “But getting to see and meet all of those Bobcats working for the Spurs was maybe the highlight.”

The students also got a thrill from a 30-minute visit and Q&A session with Bill Land and Bill Schoening, the TV and radio “voices of the Spurs,” respectively. The veteran broadcasters swapped stories, answered questions and advised the students.

Land praised Texas State’s approach of providing SJMC students with “real world” experience and Schoening mentioned the positive impact a Texas State education had on his son, Karl, a recent graduate and former KTSW sports director. Several of the students stayed for the game and saw San Antonio keep its perfect home record intact for the season, with a 100-92 victory over the Pelicans.

“It’s just a lot of fun to be able to do this for our students each year,” Carlson said. “Kick (Kickirillo) was one of my first students up in Old Main and we’ve been the best of friends for about three decades. He has built a championship broadcast team around a lot of our graduates because he was sold on them as interns while they were still students.”

Society of Professional Journalists to honor University Star staff

University Star Logo

Photo Credit: star.txstate.edu

The Society of Professional Journalists will recognize five student-journalists from the University Star at the historic Hilton Hotel in Fort Worth on March 18 and 19 for its Region 8 Mark of Excellence convention.

Region 8 is Texas and Oklahoma. If any students take first place, they automatically move on to the national competition, where they are judged against all the regions. Students receiving awards are Quixem Ramirez, Madison Teague, Brandon Sams, Monique Guerrero and Jon Wilcox.

“If you would see the way these students work, it’s just amazing to me the bond that’s here,” said Bob Bajackson, SJMC Senior Lecturer and Director of Student Publications. “I think the awards that they are able to accomplish, it’s just incredible.”

The SPJ committee will also recognize the University Star for its student-redesigned website.

“The website content has just exploded,” said Bajackson. “Last month we had over 30,000 page views.”

The University Star was formed in 1911 and is the oldest publication on campus.

Becky Larson | photo credit: sxtxstate.com/about/

Becky Larson | photo credit: sxtxstate.com/about/

The SPJ will also honor graduate student Becky Larson, who has a project as a finalist. Larson’s project tells the important story of the clash of Austin gentrification and the live music scene through loud music noise complaints.

“She did a fantastic job assimilating a range of new skills, identifying a data set and creating interactive elements that were relevant to our theme of telling stories about music with data,” said Dr. Cindy Royal, SJMC Associate Professor and Digital Media Sequence Coordinator.

Larson’s project was supported by a grant from the Knight Foundation and Online News Association.

“I am so pleased that the SPJ judges recognized this type of storytelling,” said Dr. Royal.

Texas State alum lands job at Edelman NYC

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Christopher Henry – Photo from LinkedIn

By: Jennifer Alvord

Texas State alumnus Christopher Henry has recently landed a job at Edelman, the largest public relations firm in the world, in New York City.

Henry is a part of the public affairs team and works with clients such as Microsoft, McGraw Hill Financial and the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development (MEDEI).

Henry is the former executive director of Bobcat Promotions, a student-run public relations firm on campus, and said that it taught him many valuable skills before graduating.

“Being able to walk into an interview saying, ‘I know how to write a press release’ or ‘I know how to pitch to a business’ was a vital thing for me and definitely helped me get to where I am now,” Henry said.

Before being recruited to Edelman, Henry interned for the U.S. Senator of New York, Kirsten Gillibrand, on her public affairs team and also interned for Brunswick Group, which is a financial crisis firm.

Henry couldn’t stress enough how critical internships are. “If you want to be successful in PR, you have to go above and beyond and get out of classroom experience.”

Henry also thinks that a major key to being a successful PR practitioner is to constantly be networking. “Network everywhere you go,” Henry said. “I still use many of the contacts that I’ve made throughout my career at my job at Edelman.”

10 Things I Learned on the SJMC Study Abroad Trip

Story by SJMC Study Abroad graduate student, Aisling Niestroy:

Twenty-nine inspired students. Three encouraging faculty members. Two historic countries. One unforgettable experience. The School of Journalism and Mass Communication sponsored a Study Abroad trip to London and Paris in June, and SJMC graduate assistant Aisling Niestroy shared what she learned during her time abroad.

 

The best thing about the SJMC Study Abroad program was that the majority of “book learning” was completed prior to leaving the country. We attended classes, conducted research, read articles and turned in assignments the week before beginning our journey. This afforded us the opportunity not only to learn from the scheduled media organization visits, but from the unforgettable experience of spending time in another country.

  1. Customs are different, but not necessarily foreign.
    You might be in a foreign country, but you don’t have to act like it. Respect that people do things differently. If you ask your server to split the check multiple ways, you are likely to receive a dirty look. Pay attention to how people interact, how they carry themselves in public, and try not to stick out like a sore thumb.
  1. People don’t hate Americans.
    If they do, they hide it well. While the French might have been annoyed with my crummy accent, they seemed appreciative I was making an effort to speak their language. The majority of people I met were really nice, especially when I dropped my wallet at the hotel in Paris, or when I left my phone in the back of a cab in Dublin. Both were returned to me. It helped that I tried to hold an honest conversation with every person I came into contact with. When you’re kind to others, they’re usually kind to you.
  1. Conversion rates will get you.
    Believe me when I say you can buy too many souvenirs. It is unfortunate for both your wallet and your luggage. Although the things you buy may seem less expensive, they usually aren’t in the long run. As for the British Pound, say goodbye to half of your money.
  1. The best plan is a flexible one.
    I received this same advice before attending SXSW Interactive. Going with the flow is one of your best options when exploring a new city. You can plan a day down to the minute, but something might happen to derail it, or something better might come along and change your mind.
  1. Tour, but don’t stick to the tourist places.
    I went on a different kind of tour in every city – a bike and boat tour in Paris, a self-guided walking tour in London, and an evening bus tour in Dublin. Tours are a great way to learn about the history and culture of a place, and tour guides are the perfect people to ask for city suggestions. I turned to my tour guides for recommendations of non-tourist spots, and they did not disappoint. Another good way to discover local hangouts and restaurants is to wander and get lost (but not so lost you can’t find the way home).
IMG_5520

Becca Silvas, my study abroad roommate and fellow graduate student, and I thoroughly enjoyed the Fat Tire Bike Tour around Paris. The Eiffel Tower was my absolute favorite sight.

 

  1. Try everything.
    As a picky eater, I promised myself I would try absolutely everything before deciding I didn’t like it. So I did, and more often than not, I enjoyed it. However, this doesn’t just extend to food. Not a fan of museums, but they’re free in London? Go. You never know what you’ll fall in love with.
IMG_8133

The National Museum of Ireland – Natural History was so interesting (and free). I discovered it while walking around alone in Dublin.

 

  1. Being abroad with friends is fun, but spending time alone is so good.
    I spent my last two days in Dublin by myself. At first, being alone made me nervous, but then I started to enjoy it. Because I didn’t have to coordinate my plans with anyone else’s, I was able to visit more sights and take more time appreciating what was around me.
  1. People love to share their passions with you.
    After listening to the employees at PR firm Weber Shandwick talk so highly of their jobs, I contemplated switching career paths. Even my various tour guides made me envious of what they do. Talking to people about the things they love is a wonderful way to turn strangers into acquaintances.
IMG_6875

Weber Shandwick put on quite a presentation for the group during our visit to their offices in London.

 

  1. Writing is a required skill for any media job.
    Someone mentioned the importance of writing and communication skills at every business visit. It didn’t matter if the company was focused on journalism or public relations. Good writers make better employees.
  1. Everyone has pride for where they come from.
    And they are not afraid to tell you all about it. They’re also often curious about where you’re from (even more so if it’s a recognizable place like Texas). I swapped hometown pride stories with many people I met throughout my trip, including the three Irish Aislings I found in Dublin. They practically convinced me to never come home.

For the most part, I was pretty confident I knew what to expect when I arrived in Europe. Thankfully, I was wrong. The study abroad program changed my life, and I am confident it can do the same for you.

Digital Speaker Series features SJMC graduate and NY Times staffer Maira Garcia

by Becky Larson:

IMG_3065

Maira Garcia at TX State’s Digital Speaker Series

Maira Garcia is a senior staff editor at the New York Times. She works to organize, strategize and push content for the paper’s homepage, NYTimes.com.

Interviewed by digital media graduate student Jordon Brown and speaking to what felt like a hometown crowd, Garcia, who is a Texas State graduate, returned to the university this past week as the most recent speaker in the SJMC’s Digital Entrepreneurship Series.

“I learned a lot at TX State…”

Garcia earned both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree with Texas State and was one of the first to matriculate under the graduate program’s Digital Media concentration.

It was this skills-focused digital concentration that she told the audience was one of the most important aspects of her time at Texas State.

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