Ad Club in San Francisco! Career Exploration: Discover America

The Ad Club at Texas State visited San Francisco for its annual agency tour the week of January 8 – 14. Faculty Advisor Emmeline Aguirre Olson accompanied 21 members on the trip. The unusually rainy weather made the trip to the City by the Bay longer than expected with an extended layover in Denver an unplanned stop in Orange County.

The Club visited a variety of big, global agencies and small, tight-knit companies, including Goodby Silverstein & Partners, BBDO San Francisco, Duncan Channon, Grey San Francisco, Pereira & O’Dell, and AKQA San Francisco. The group went on an exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour of AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, where they met with members of the sponsorship department who provided insight into sports marketing and branding. The trip also included a visit to the Academy of Arts University where students were provided information about the graduate program and online undergraduate courses available to enhance and continue their education.

What made this experience worthwhile was the availability of these agencies. Each agency had its own unique personality and culture. Students met with CEOs, creative directors, account heads, interns, human resources, and office administrators. The group was also able to meet up with Texas State alumna Courtney Horrigan (2015), whose second day at BBDO coincided with the tour. By meeting with such a variety of personnel, the Ad Club was able get a better understanding of all components of an advertising agency.

Story by Victoria Salinas

Alum Spotlight: Kevin Quintero

From valet attendant to co-founder of a digital marketing agency, Kevin Quintero is the definition of an innovated entrepreneur. Tenoch Labs is the brain child of two roommates who didn’t want to work under anyone besides themselves and knew that containing their creative minds would be selfish. With his “If anyone can do it, I can do it better” mentality, Quintero has manifested the perfect amount of perseverance to become a successful entrepreneur.

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Raised in Dallas, Quintero found his calling in digital media at a very young age. He recalls falling in love with film, editing and storytelling by the seventh grade. After attending Dallas Community College Quintero was drawn to the nature scene of central Texas and knew San Marcos was the place to be. Once Quintero researched Texas State’s electronic media program it was deemed the ideal next step towards his career.

When Quintero arrived in San Marcos he fell in love with the city, Texas State and most importantly, the professors at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Out of every resource Texas State offers, Quintero advises students to take full advantage of creating relationships with professors.

“The professors are really good people, they’re real people. They’re just there to teach. Mass Comm professors are good at communicating and want to build relationships with you. They know their field. They know everything is changing and media is shifting,” Quintero says.

Many of Quintero’s peers tell him that he is lucky for finding something is he so passionate about and that it comes naturally. They fail to realize the amount of time and effort that has been put into perfecting his craft. “Nothing comes easy, it’s not supposed to come easy,” says Quintero. He recommends that anyone who lacks a passion should try to do something they hate and they might find the love in it.

Quintero had no idea what advertising and marketing even consisted of until he was working as a valet attendant for a building that housed a marketing agency. When he searched the name of the business, he discovered that his hobbies matched almost every service they offered. At this point, he knew he could capitalize off his skill. His mindset during school began to take an entrepreneurial approach and thought of ways he could sell what he was being taught. Quintero explained, “You got to see beyond the textbook. How can I make money off of this? How can I offer this to someone that has money?”

As graduation was approaching, Quintero and his roommate, Hector Sifuentes, were managing their new business, Intel Productions, with minor projects. He was advised by peers and professors that seeking out a position with an agency would be a safer plan. Quintero expressed that it didn’t feel right to him, he had fallen in love with free creativity and the business.

One of Intel Productions first major projects was a collaborative effort with public relations agency, APC Collective. A Jarritos commercial created by the roommates for the agency and caught the attention of APC Collective. This was the start of a beneficial relationship between the two. After the project, Quintero made sure to keep in touch with the founder of the agency. The founder pleaded with Quintero to keep Intel Productions thriving and not work for anyone else, emphasizing that he will be underpaid and they are worth more. After voicing his concern with a living wage, the founder of APC collective offered to assist Quintero and Sifuentes and officially invest in the newly rebranded Tenoch Labs.

Jarritos: Love is Super Good from Intel Productions on Vimeo.

Kevin Quintero is now living out his digital media dream and can’t exaggerate enough how great it feels. Quintero’s main piece of advice to others is to never stop doing what you love, “Just keep working hard and then one person looks at your work and says ‘damn that’s awesome,’ and that one person turns to two and so on. You just can’t stop working.”

Mobile Storytelling Students to Visit Bastrop State Park

flowers bastrop state parkTexas State School of Journalism and Mass Communication students will head to Bastrop State Park next weekend as part of a Mobile Storytelling in the Park course. Professor Dale Blasingame is teaching the course with 19 students enrolled. They’ll be spending a weekend in the park while producing social video content for Snapchat, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram that Texas Parks and Wildlife can use to encourage other young people to visit Texas state parks.

Going Mobile

Students in the Mobile Storytelling in the Park course have spent the past five weeks learning how to turn stories solely using their phones. They’ll be responsible for creating social content that will chronicle the rebirth of Bastrop State Park, which suffered a devastating wildfire in 2011 and a flood last year. Signs of life are emerging at the park – including flowers and new trees, nearly 2,000,000 of which have been planted in the past five years.

“This is a different experience for the students – to find the beauty in nature that isn’t instantly observable,” Blasingame said. “This is a great park, and I’m confident it’s going to rebound. It’s an honor to have our students play a role in that rebirth.”

This is the second year for the Mobile Storytelling in the Park course. Last spring, Blasingame’s students produced video content from Garner State Park with a goal to get more young people to visit our state parks. Blasingame will also teach a version of this class over Summer 1, along with Kym Fox and her Feature Writing course, as part of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication’s first-ever Study in America course offering. Students will visit six state parks and three national park properties across west Texas and southern New Mexico.

 

Emily Sharp in D.C.

The 2017 Presidential Inauguration was one for the books. As protestors, supporters, heads-of-state and average citizens filled the Capitol building and its grounds on Jan. 20, members of the University Star joined their ranks to cover the big event. Editor-in-chief Emily Sharp attended both the presidential inauguration and the Women’s March, while also covering the Texas State Strutters’ performance for the school newspaper. Sharp sat down with us and shared her experience in Washington, D.C. and attending these historical events.

Q: How did the opportunity come about?

A: “The Friday before we left, we brought it up with our advisor and told him we would love to go but didn’t know if we had the funds for it. He told us he could make that happen and pay for it using travel funds that the University Star had. Going and covering the Strutters’ first-hand was an opportunity we didn’t want to miss. While we were sitting there talking about it, I asked if there was enough money for two people to go. I didn’t want my news editor, Bri, to go alone. It would be dangerous and with the amount of stories to cover, one person wouldn’t be enough. Within two hours they informed us that everything was being sorted out by the travel office and told us that we were going.”

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Photo by Emily Sharp and Bri Watkins

Q: From a journalism and historical standpoint, how important was attending this event to you?

A: “Any inauguration, being able to go to that, for many people, is a once-in-a-lifetime chance, and I don’t know if I’d be able to do that again. That alone was a lot but also the Women’s March, which itself is probably going to be in history books. It was just another thing that I couldn’t believe I got to be a part of. As far as the Strutters’ performance, the university needed to cover something as big as that.”

Q: How do you feel about the backlash received from Texas State students about the stutters performing?

A: “I understand that some people are going to be unhappy about it. I think regardless of the election results people would still be upset that the Strutters attending. Regardless of that, they [the Strutters] get to add to their list of performances that they got to do. They’ve performed in China, they’ve performed at past presidential inaugurations, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. It was a great opportunity for those girls to experience performing on a stage that large.”

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Photo by: Emily Sharp and Bri Watkins

Q: What were some main takeaways from attending the inauguration?

A: “Security was ridiculous. I have never seen anything like that up close. The biggest thing I noticed during the inauguration was the split in the people. Whoever went up and spoke had a huge crowd reaction. There were never only polite claps for whoever was up there. Both from the protesters nearby and the people attending the inauguration, there was noise. It was crazy to see the divide so clearly and see all the different types of people. We see a little bit of that on campus, but it’s different to see it on a national scale of people from all around the world.”

Q: What was the Women’s March like?

A: “I noticed the contrast between the people the most. Both [the inauguration and Women’s March] had amazing people and both had not-so-great people. I was so surprised how peaceful the Women’s March was, especially with the slightly violent protest the day before. We expected to see Trump supporters in the streets, but we didn’t see any of that. If we did see someone wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat, nobody was calling them out. It was all very peaceful and I think that was the best way to get their message across. It was huge! It sounded like when you get concessions at a game and you hear the roar of the crowd — that’s what it sounded like throughout the whole city. We were 30 minutes away, walking to our hotel, and you could still hear the roar. It was crazy to see, and the thing I remember the most is seeing the wide variety of ages, types, color — everybody that you could think of to be represented was there. It was something I feel like I’m going to remember for my whole life. Talking to people from both sides really humanized it for me.”

Q: Was there anything that took you by surprise?

A: “The participating peacefully took me by surprise. The amount of security took me by surprise. A lot of people up there [Washington, D.C.] were saying that they’ve never seen that amount of security before. That was interesting to see, I expected to see security but not that amount of security. You felt fenced in everywhere you went, like at any moment you could be trapped in an area. Gates and fences everywhere. They also changed the parade route last minute, so that was a huge surprise. Luckily, we were still able to catch the Strutters. Another thing that took me by surprise was the attendance at the inauguration. The sections were not filled up at all. I was expecting there to be a lot more protesters as well as supporters.”

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about your trip as a whole?

A: “I’m really thankful that we got the chance to go. just to be able to record the Strutters’ performance. That has gotten so much attention, there have been people who reached out to us and thanked us for covering it. It was a crazy trip with little sleep but it was so worth it to get these historical aspects and bring them back to Texas State with our coverage on it. There were people from all over following it because we were one of the many news sources covering it. I think if people can, they should attend celebrations of different points of view because that’s the only way to grow and understand. That’s why I do what I do.”

Texas State announces new NSAC team

Texas State NSAC Advertising teamTexas State is excited to announce the student members of its National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) Team. NSAC is the premier college advertising competition that provides more than 2,000 college students the real-world experience of creating a strategic advertising/marketing/media campaign for a corporate client.

This year’s client is frozen food manufacturer, Tai Pei. Students from the Advertising, Communications Design and Marketing Sequences will work through the spring semester to create and present a marketing and advertising plan for Tai Pei. Their work will be judged by a panel of advertising professionals at the district, semi-final and national levels.  In 2016, the Texas State NSAC team brought home the District title.  The 2017 team hopes to go all the way to New Orleans for the National Competition in June.

Account Management
Adam Raiford
Vanessa Villescas

Account Planning
Dinesse Dominguez
Katelyn Neu

Media Planning
Ashlee Bilbo
Adriana Bueno
Kalyne Leger
Chelsey Rosine

Copy Direction
Philip Bridges
Kiersta Hoover
Kiley Jones
Zachary Reed

Art Direction
Beau Carnes
Pedro Moreno
Angela Rhys
Christina Rodriguez
Albert Suarez

Production
Tara Dotson
Tyler Weems

Experiential
Breonna Ruffin

Plans Book
Samantha Byrd

Faculty Advisors
Jenny Buschhorn, MA, Assistant Professor of Practice, Advertising
Dr. Rick Wilson, Assistant Professor, Marketing

 

8th Annual Graduate Student Research Conference

Photo by Dr. David Nolan

Photo by Dr. David Nolan

The Graduate College once again held a conference for graduate student to showcase their studies and projects. Held on Nov.15-16, it was the Eighth Annual International Conference for Graduate Student Research at Texas State University. Mass Communication graduate students presented their research and plan for furthering their research questions and studies. All the presentations were reviewed and open for questions by those who sat in on the presentations.

Mass Communication student Dylan Lochridge-Fletcher presented her research on “Women of Color on Television.” She delved into the stereotypes women of color usually have on screen as well as the set roles they are limited to play. She picked three different television shows that represented the stereotype role, has a woman of color play the sidekick role and then one show that had a woman of color as the lead role. She brought attention and insight to the topic of stereotypes of women of color as they are portrayed on television.

Another Mass Communication graduate student, Sara Shields, presented her topic of “Exploring Effects of Social Media on Brand Perception.” She explains that brands online reach not only more people but have transformed to a more personal and relatable technique to sell. She gave examples of commercials that show stories or things that have little to do with the actual product and more of what she calls “pulling of the heart strings.” She brought fresh insight to the new method of brands connecting to their audience.

There were many presenters from all fields and majors of the graduate program that shared new ideas and fields of research to be considered. The conference not only had student speakers but  the keynote speaker for the luncheon on the 16th was Dr. Cal Van Aacken, the Learning Lab Coordinator at the Student Learning Assistance Center at Texas State University. He presented “Veterans Transitioning to Graduate School: What it is like and what you can do to support them.”

Overall the panels, speakers and student presenters brought new ideas, insight and thought to their fields of study as well representing the students who further their study and education.

Story by Annabel Fidler

Featured Student: Sara Shields

11205507_1094288760588668_4648911632773368105_nWith a love for drones, web design and technology, Digital Media graduate student Sara Shields is constantly looking for new, innovative ways to tell a story. That’s what led her to her newest endeavor: graduation video “e-nouncements.” As she works hard in earning her master’s degree from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Shields shared with us what led to her passion for these new media projects and how she hopes to use them for her future.

Q: What is the “senior graduation” video about?

Sara: I just recently made a “senior graduation” video (shown below).
While I was doing a friend’s senior portraits, I also captured candid moments during our photo session through a video format.

Q: Why did you make the video?

Sara: I’ve always tried to find interesting or creative ways to visually tell a story. For a few years, I’ve been doing senior portraits and designing graduation announcements for college seniors. One day I was trying to think of new creative ways to announce a college graduation, when all of a sudden the video idea hit me: “E-nnouncements.” Rather than announce a senior’s graduation through printed images or invitations, why not “e-nnounce” it online through a video? Since my main passion is videography, I decided this would be a perfect opportunity to try something new and different on a digital platform.

Q: What would you like to do once you graduate?

Sara: Once I graduate, I hope to find a job doing videography or web design, as these are two of my passions.  


Sara received her bachelor’s degree in Public Relations at Texas State University, and now she teaches two Web Design and Publishing courses in the mass communication program and loves the challenges and opportunities in web design. Great job, Sara! If you would like a graduation video made by Sara, check out her contact information and website below!

Email: saramshields@gmail.com
Website: www.sara-shields.com

Congratulations, 2016 CBI National Student Production Awards Winners!

image0012016 CBI National Student Production Awards Winners

We would like to take a moment to congratulate the winners of the CBI National Student Production Awards Competition 2016, which were honored during the College Broadcasters, Inc. National Student Electronic Media Convention this past week.

  • 2nd Place – Best Audio Promo – “60-Second Science” – Greg Arellano, Jourdan Bazley
  • 2nd Place – Best Video Promo – “Girrrl Party Promo” – Liliana Rivera
  • 3rd Place – Best Video Promo – “KTSW Quad Promo” – Geoffrey King
  • 4th Place – Best Audio Documentary/Public Affairs – “In the Public Interest: LGBTQIA” – DaLyah Jones, Jacquelyn Carter, Sarah Bey and Clayton Kelley

Congratulations to our creative and talented students!

Going with the Current: A Google News Lab Workshop

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Nick Whitaker, Media Outreach Manager at Google, spoke about strategies, trends and directions in data and information and tools that Google News Lab uses to help journalists and entrepreneurs change the future of media by organizing the world’s information and making it universally accessible and useful during 2016 Mass Comm Week.

“This is a unique moment in the history of news,” Whitaker said as he opened the Wednesday afternoon session of Mass Comm Week on October 27, 2016. “There are a lot of labs popping up and people are trying new things. Industries are realizing that we should not place in one place forever. It should be adapting and changing.”

Whitaker spoke about Google News Lab’s effort to empower innovation at the intersection of media and technology by sharing his experiences of collaborating with journalists and entrepreneurs to build the future of media with Google. While there are millions of ways of storytelling and understanding the information,Whitaker said “we do this in three ways: training and development, trends, and programs.”

Whitaker also spoke about the importance of VR Journalism that virtual reality is a totally new medium of telling stories. “Interfaces are changing the way we see things. We need to come out from a comfort zone,” said Whitaker. “We need to change the mindset about anxiety into excitement about experimenting with technologies.”

Whitaker emphasized that visual striking storytelling is flourishing like never before and encouraged journalism students with new opportunities for innovation in journalism.

You can follow Nick Whitaker on Twitter at @googlenewslab. For more information about Google News Lab, visit the website g.co/newslab. 

News Engagement Day success!

Despite the disheartening statistics behind Millennials and their involvement with current news, Dr. Kelly Kaufhold spent News Engagement Day (Tuesday, Oct. 4) proving otherwise. Once again, Kaufhold did an amazing job last week engaging students in the best way possible. A “Cash Cab” style questionnaire and fantastic incentives kept the students crossing the front of LBJ Student Center curious. Kaufhold was able to draw in many students enthusiastic to prove their knowledge on current events. Even though some of Kaufhold’s questions left participants scratching their heads, he accumulated large crowds with correct answers! A perfect mix of pop culture and politics revealed that these students are far from letting statistics determine their standards of news involvement.

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